Ethical consumerism

and the future of sustainable fashion

and the future of sustainable fashion #3

Even though sustainability topic is raised more and more nowadays, the issue of the fast fashion and the lack of choice possibilities is still there. According to Accenture research done in 2014 June with 30.000 participants, “in North America, for example, just 21% of respondents report that they ‘often’ or ‘always’ consider sustainability when selecting products and services, a proportion which reaches just 27% in Europe. In Asia, just over one-third take sustainability into consideration, but awareness (of sustainability)is highest in Africa (39%) and Latin America (39%)”.

In this last blog post we ask Enkel Basics, the sustainable fashion company, to define who the ethical consumer is and we will look over some innovative companies, which are trying to engage customers for a more sustainable decision making.


Enkel Basics speaks about ethical consumerism:

Ethical consumer to us is a consumer who is aware of the impacts of the goods he/she is buying and then makes the best possible purchase decision available to him/her.Any of us can take part in ethical consumerism. It is quite simple:
1. Be conscious about what you buy.
2. Be aware of the long production line that lies behind making a product. It may cost you a few pennies more, but it also impacts more people, behind the clothing production.
How we engage our customers into being ethical consumers?
We give them 2 years guarantee when they buy a t-shirt at Enkel. What does that mean? It simply means that you, as a consumer, will most probably buy less t-shirts for this period of time, because we believe, our products are durable enough to last that long. In addition, if the fabric breaks or if a seam rips, we will mend it for you. We do this because sustainability does not stop with production — it’s as much about slowing down our consumption.”(Enkel Basics)

It is true that customers should rethink and change their behaviour towards shopping. If there is a demand-there will be a supply. On the other hand, some sustainable fashion companies are shaping their business ideas in a fun and easy way, breaking the myths that sustainable fashion is complicated and much more expensive.

Take a look at these examples, maybe they will be an inspiration for your future shopping or even fashion company?

Rent the Runway

Rent the Runway lets consumers rent a high-end dress of their choice for one night. Customers may order online, and the dress is delivered to their doorstep. The company handles subsequent cleaning. It also offers showrooms in which customers can try on the dresses before ordering them.

Nudie Jeans

Nudie Jeans creates commitment by encouraging its customers to wear their jeans for up to six months without washing them to give them their true, personal fit. The company also encourages its customers to return used jeans so that the company may reuse the materials for new jeans. It has also opened a jeans workshop where customers can have their jeans repaired. This reduces the environmental impact per pair of jeans.

ZaoZao

ZaoZao from Hong Kong creates dedicated customers and collaborative innovation by letting them pre-order garments from up-and-coming fashion designers. The company’s online platform allows designers to make pre- launches, which enables the site’s community of fashion enthusiasts to finance production.


We thank Enkel Basics for sharing their practise in our series of blogs of sustainability. Finally, we invite you to express and share your own experiences and thoughts on sustainable fashion:

What are the biggest challenges or issues you are facing when it comes to sustainable clothes?

We believe that there is no better way to learn about this topic than from all of our experiences. Therefore — drop your comment here or send your thoughts to the e-mail ieva@easysize.me — we are always open for discussions.

If you wish to overlook our blog series and learn about the sustainability more, check our blog posts “Enkel. A new way of fashion #1" and “You should know what you’re buying.A new way of fashion #2".

Ieva (ieva@easysize.me), Communications @ EasySize